The government has questioned the agenda behind the BBC documentary

The Indian government on Thursday slammed UK's national broadcaster BBC for a documentary on Prime Minister Narendra Modi, describing it as a "propaganda piece designed to push a particular discredited narrative".

The government also said that it reflected a "continuing colonial mindset" and questioned the agenda behind it.

The documentary in question is a two-part series attacking PM Modi's tenure as Gujarat Chief Minister during the Gujarat riots of 2002.

"We think that this is a propaganda piece, designed to push a particular discredited narrative. The bias, lack of objectivity & continuing colonial mindset is blatantly visible," Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) Spokesperson Arindam Bagchi said in response to a question at the weekly media briefing.

He pointed out that it had not been screened in India.

"If anything, this film or documentary is a reflection on the agency & individuals that are peddling this narrative again," Bagchi added, referring to the documentary by the United Kingdom's national broadcaster.

He also said the documentary "makes us wonder about the purpose of this exercise and the agenda behind it. Frankly, we don't wish to dignify such efforts".

Responding to another question on apparent remarks made by former UK Secretary Jack Straw in the documentary series, Bagchi said "He (Jack Straw) seems to be referring to some internal UK report. How do I have access to that? It's a 20-year-old report. Why would we jump on it now? Just because Jack says it how do they lend it that much legitimacy."

The documentary in question is a two-part series attacking PM Modi's tenure as Gujarat Chief Minister during the Gujarat riots of 2002.

Meanwhile, UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak shut down a Pakistani-origin MP who raised the matter in the British Parliament by asking if the PM agreed with the assessment of diplomats in the Foreign Office that Narendra Modi was directly responsible for the violence in Gujarat.

"Mr Speaker, the UK government’s position on this has been clear and long standing and hasn’t changed. Of course, we don’t tolerate persecution anywhere, but I am not sure I agree at all with the characterization the honorable gentleman has put forward,” PM Sunak retorted in response to the question.